Customer Experience

VP/VoC Manager—Digital Analytics at JPMorgan Chase & Co. Talks About Using the Survey Process to Analyze the Current CX Landscape

19 May, 2017

Jon Black, Vice President, Voice of the Customer (VoC) Manager—Digital Analytics at 
JPMorgan Chase & Co., outlined how to build effective surveys and survey channels in a world where demographics and technology are continuously changing.

At the outset of his keynote presentation at the 2017 Customer Experience Leadership Forum held on March 23 in San Francisco, Black said, “I’m going to talk about where we’ve been and where we’re going, what we know, what we can do, and how we optimize that from a survey standpoint and also from a customer feedback standpoint. What we’re trying to do is analyze customers from the standpoint of an aggregation level. To do this, we need to monitor feedback and get our customers to do what we want them to do. How can we make this better? What will be the next CX disruption—from a digital standpoint and from the way our customers are relaying their information to us?” he asked.

“What we’re trying to do is analyze customers from the standpoint of an aggregation level. To do this, we need to monitor the feedback and get our customers to do what we want them to do. How can we make this better?”

Black went through some historical survey formats such as comment cards and mailers in the 1990s (1% to 2% response rate), email surveys in the early 2000s (10% to 30% response rate), and, in the last decade, the advent of mass distribution of scores and a dynamic aspect to the feedback. “With the social media tsunami in the last decade, we have omnichannel listening to multiple voices about what people are saying about our products and company. We have to set up different listening posts to understand what our customers are doing,” said Black.

“With the social media tsunami in the last decade, we have omnichannel listening to multiple voices about what people are saying about our products and company. We have to set up different listening posts to understand what our customers are doing.”

“The introduction of the iPhone in 2007 followed by the 2009 introduction of Android caused mobile penetration to advance the space with regard to customer feedback and what people are talking about online,” Black pointed out. “From 2009 to 2014, there was a tremendous amount of mobile penetration with little decrease in tablet usage. And mobile is still growing,” he said. “In 2009, when we looked at survey programs, we were consistently at 22% to 25% response rates. With the increasing mobile penetration, we saw steady declines to around 18% in 2014. Was this survey fatigue? Were people getting tired of filling out surveys? I don’t think so. People were evolving. They were finding different ways to be heard.” For example, from 2007 to 2015, TripAdvisor saw its activity increase only slightly whereas activity on Twitter increased four-fold from 2007 to 2011 and then began to decline by half, according to Google Trends. Facebook began to decline in 2011 as Snapchat activity skyrocketed.

“So, what’s going to be the next big disruption? Are you getting the whole picture from your data?” asked Black. “From a CX survey perspective, we know to listen, analyze, and act. From a listening standpoint, there are tons of tools, and what you use has to do with the people you have. As far as analyzing, what are you using to best visualize your data? We’re talking about building your internal analytics platform and throwing data science at it.” Black emphasized that, in terms of analysis, the critical factor is determining what’s being missed. Regarding action, he said, “We need to close the feedback loop. We get the data, analyze it, and we need to get it back to the business—from the CEO to the frontline employee.”

“From a CX survey perspective, we know to listen, analyze, and act. From a listening standpoint, there are tons of tools, and what you use has to do with the people you have.”

Black then described executive insight review objectives—a VoC program on top of an analytics program. The components of this are scores (structured data), determining drivers of loyalty, identifying problems, competitive benchmarking, social footprint, unstructured data (VoC), and custom insights (the deliverables).

In summary, Black presented these criteria for a successful VoC program:

• Executive buy-in on the CX feedback strategy from the top all the way down.
• Tools–How are you going to build your CEM analytics platform?
• CX change agents–Who are you going to hire? Data Scientists? Data Analysts? Customer Success Managers?
• The right mix of listening posts—the methods you’re using to gather feedback.
• What percentage of the survey is open-ended text from your customer? “Get rid of drop-down menu surveys that constrain your customers to limited experience choices,” he advised.
• How are you passing feedback on to employees that need it?

Visit Argyle Executive Forum's 2019 Customer Experience Leadership Forum: Beyond Satisfaction, Building Loyalty in New York, NY on Mar 12, 2019

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